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What Information Will Your Lawyer Need To Assist Your Long-Term Defense?

Important legal information for Houston Criminal Defense Attorney

What Information Will Your Lawyer Need To Assist Your Long-Term Defense? 

When you’re accused of a crime, your lawyer needs specific information about what happened so they can prepare for your longer-term defense. This includes preparing suppression motions, preparing for the trial, negotiating plea deals, and preparing for sentencing. Usually, the facts will be enough to refuse a false story from the prosecution. This makes it even more crucial to tell your lawyer exactly what happened and be forthcoming from the start. 

Here is a breakdown of the information your lawyer will need to build the best case for your defense. 

What happened on the day of your arrest?

Give your lawyer a timeline of where you went, who you saw, and what you did that day. Try to remember specific details like when you woke up, how much you slept, what you ate, and any medications you took. 

What were the circumstances surrounding your arrest? 

Your lawyer will need to know how you approached by law enforcement. Did they have a warrant for your arrest? Recall at what point the police told you were under arrest or if there was a moment when you felt you were not free to leave. After the initial encounter with the police, what restrictions were immediately places on your freedom. Recall when and what time you were arrested, how you were physically restrained, and whether you were taken to jail. Try to provide as much detail as possible about your encounter with the police. 

What happened immediately following your arrest?

It’s common for law enforcement to transport you to their stated for further questioning following the arrest. Try as best you can to remember what questions they asked you and let your lawyer know how they interrogated you. If possible, recall how long you spent talking to the police, who was present during the questioning and if the interview was recorded. YIt’sour attorney needs to know if the officers took notes during the interrogation or if the session was recorded. They will also need to know what questions were asked, whether or not you signed any documents. Give your lawyer details about what you discussed with the officers while you were in their custody. 

What evidence and witnesses did the police obtain?

If the event took place somewhere with witnesses, it’s likely the police have identified them for potential questioning. Try your best to remember if there were any witnesses at the and scene if you saw them. A witness can also be someone who heard about the crime or anyone you spoke to about the crime. Your lawyer will ask you to provide names and contact information for these witnesses that you know personally as well as the status of your relationship with the witness. In addition to witnesses, think of any potential evidence the police collected from the scene. Was there any evidence that could have been left behind that the officers did not see?

We hope this article sheds some light on the information you should be ready to share with your attorney to get the ball rolling on your defense. While we hope you learned what to expect, remember that content online is not to be interpreted as legal advice. You need to speak to a qualified defense attorney who can provide the best information on how to move forward. 

If you’re looking for a defense attorney in Houston to represent your case, call the offices of Christoper T. Gore to learn more about setting up a consultation.

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